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Venatosapiens Erectus by Ashere Venatosapiens Erectus by Ashere
Venatosapiens erectus is a species of oligocene dromeosaurid that is known from artifacts and partial fossil remnants. A swift and nomadic creature, the Venatosapiens lived in tribal flocks, had mastered the art of wooden tools and weapons, and had developed a complex language of integrated chirps, snarls, and body language. They had no set territories, but flocks seldom occupied the same area for long amounts of time. War was unknown, as conflict between a flock was settled by a contest between the patriarchs.
The flock was not a tightly knit group, but a loose aggregation of mated pairs and young that moved together for mutual protection. Venatosapiens is not the only species of intelligent maniraptoran; the escarpments to the north of the great plains are home to Avisapiens Saurotheos, a slightly smaller genus that is more at home in the mountain scrub then the grasslands.
For more information on Avisapiens, visit researcher Nemo Ramjet here at [link]

Venatosapiens Erectus design is copyright 2008 Asher Elbein
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:iconhublerdon:
HUBLERDON Featured By Owner Jul 21, 2015  New Deviant Hobbyist General Artist
Perhaps the basal ceratopsian they have is used like a pig, to sniff put valuable foodstuffs beneath the ground. Maybe venatosapiens like to add truffle oil to their hadrosaur.
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:iconashere:
Ashere Featured By Owner Jul 24, 2015  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
I like it!
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:iconhublerdon:
HUBLERDON Featured By Owner Jul 28, 2015  New Deviant Hobbyist General Artist
You should redo this, with what we know now.
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:iconashere:
Ashere Featured By Owner Aug 2, 2015  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
There's an idea!
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:icongwiber49ofireland:
Gwiber49ofIreland Featured By Owner May 26, 2015  Hobbyist General Artist
Some dinosaurs had opposable thumbs you know!
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:iconsaberrex:
Saberrex Featured By Owner Sep 13, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
this is quite similar to my modern velociraptorine Gorgoraptor. but instead of using spears, Gorgoraptor sharpens branches on trees and also plants stakes into a secluded spot then the pack runs prey into them while attempting to kill the intended victim.
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:iconashere:
Ashere Featured By Owner Sep 13, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Interesting--like the bison kills ice age humans used?
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:iconsaberrex:
Saberrex Featured By Owner Sep 13, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
yes exactly, only it hunts prey from 10 to 200 feet long and allies with another dromaeosaur species called Tyrannoraptor and a Tyrannosaurid called Vastatotyrannus aka V. rex. they share portions of each other's kills in exchange for protecting each other's young and old. (Vastatotyrannus and Gorgoraptor are both in my gallery if you want to have a look.)
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:iconjd-man:
JD-man Featured By Owner Aug 27, 2011
"War was unknown, as conflict between a flock was settled by a contest between the patriarchs."

It'd probably make more sense if said contest was btwn the matriarchs, given that hypercarnivorous dinos (like hypercarnivorous birds) probably had reverse sexual dimorphism (See the following quote). Otherwise, cool pic.

BTW, is it safe to assume that they evolved smaller sickle claws, given their mastery of the art of wooden tools & weapons?

Quoting Bakker (See the 2 paragraphs w/highlighted words: [link] ): "Three hours north of our Lakota quarries we have sites from the end of the Cretaceous, sixty-six million years ago, when that most famous of dinosaurs, T. rex, played the top predator role. The great tyrannosaurs are cousins of the raptors, and the tyrannosaur data matrix helps us look into the mind of the raptor. My colleague from the Black Hills Institute, Pete Larson, has discovered a remarkable thing about the gender roles in rex. The biggest, most powerfully muscled specimens are female, as shown by the structure of the bones around the base of the tail.
Female dominance is a powerful piece of evidence that permits us to reconstruct the private lives of Cretaceous predatory dinosaurs. A family structure built around a large female is rare in meat-eating reptiles and mammals today, but it's the rule for one category of predatory species — carnivorous birds. Owls, hawks, and eagles have societies organized around female dominance, and we can think of tyrannosaurs and raptors as giant, ground- running eagles."
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:iconashere:
Ashere Featured By Owner Aug 27, 2011  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
I wrote that years back, before I had read the relevant Bakker. I agree--the largest and most fierce of the pack would, had I created them now, be female.

The featherfolk illustration that came later I designed keeping the above in mind. Thanks for your comment.
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:iconjd-man:
JD-man Featured By Owner Aug 27, 2011
"Thanks for your comment."

You're welcome.
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:iconponchofirewalker01:
PonchoFirewalker01 Featured By Owner Feb 12, 2011
Is that little ceratopsian prey or a pet?
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:iconashere:
Ashere Featured By Owner Feb 12, 2011  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
It could be either. it certainly looks a bit too terrified to be a pet, but that's just my interpretation.
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:iconponchofirewalker01:
PonchoFirewalker01 Featured By Owner Feb 12, 2011
Ah okay :D
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:iconmojeznamkyavatar:
Mojeznamkyavatar Featured By Owner Jul 15, 2010
nice
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:icontehfuzzyduck:
TehFuzzyDuck Featured By Owner May 13, 2009
Wonderful work.
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:iconladyredfingers:
LadyRedfingers Featured By Owner Apr 10, 2009  Professional General Artist
Most realistic sentient dinosaur idea I've ever seen.
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:iconjohnfaa:
JohnFaa Featured By Owner Oct 1, 2008  Student Writer
I think, though, these are slightly more credible than Nemo's; at least if both species are dromeosaurs
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:iconashere:
Ashere Featured By Owner Oct 1, 2008  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Why? I just modified a dromeasaurid body plan to function on prairie. Nemo takesa different route, but I think an equally compelling one.
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:iconjohnfaa:
JohnFaa Featured By Owner Oct 2, 2008  Student Writer
Well, I just think the body plan of his Avisapiens works better for a troodontid or an ornithomimid, although I'm not saying a sentient dromeosaur like that couldn't evolve. Its just that the toothtless beak would probably not be required, since it would be more usefull to have the front limbs as the main manipolatory organs rather than the rostrum (I think I spelled both words wrong).
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:iconashere:
Ashere Featured By Owner Oct 2, 2008  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Gotcha. Makes sense, actually, and I'd wondered about that myself. In fact, now that you mention it, a manipulatory bill doesn't make a whole lot of sense for any nonavian dinosaur because they maintain the grasping digits. Although I doubt that even a dinosaur with grasping hands didn't use its beak as a manipulatory organ.
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:iconjohnfaa:
JohnFaa Featured By Owner Oct 2, 2008  Student Writer
The main issue for me is that, even if they use the snout as a manipulatory organ, I don't think it would be necessary to become a beak; a carnivorous sophont most likely wouldn't obtain any advantage of loosing the teeth
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:icongozer-the-destroyor:
Gozer-The-Destroyor Featured By Owner Jun 1, 2008
Ha, this is cool. Great tribute, too!
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:iconashere:
Ashere Featured By Owner Jun 2, 2008  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Thanks!
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:iconndean:
NDean Featured By Owner May 31, 2008   Writer
amazing: love the detail. Looks real. I know that wasnt a biological response but its the best I can do lmfao
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:iconbullet-magnet:
Bullet-Magnet Featured By Owner May 30, 2008
That's awesome. Just to point out: the convention is to capitalise only the genus and higher taxa, not the species name (or subspecies name) and to italicise both genus and species (and subspecies).

So it should be written Venatosapiens erectus :)
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:iconashere:
Ashere Featured By Owner May 31, 2008  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Thanks. I'll change it.
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:iconnemo-ramjet:
nemo-ramjet Featured By Owner Apr 26, 2008
Hey, this is GREAT! Thanks for pimping my sophont as well! The artwork is really, really nice...
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:iconashere:
Ashere Featured By Owner Apr 27, 2008  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Your welcome. I'm a HUGE fan of all your work.
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:iconnemo-ramjet:
nemo-ramjet Featured By Owner Apr 29, 2008
I wonder how a two-sapient world would be like... Venatosapiens in the americas, Avisapiens in the old world?
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:iconashere:
Ashere Featured By Owner Apr 29, 2008  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Maybe... Certainly they aren't from the same exact area, I doubt either would tolerate the other. They're probably related to about the degree humans and lemurs are. Same general group, but very different otherwise. I know that Venatosapiens is an inhabitant of the great plains region in america, but for some reason I always saw Avisapiens in the mediterranian and subsaharan africa.
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:iconnemo-ramjet:
nemo-ramjet Featured By Owner Apr 29, 2008
Ah, the Mediterranean... My kind of place! =) This would be a very nice project if developped to the fullest...
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:iconashere:
Ashere Featured By Owner Apr 29, 2008  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Oh, I'd love too, but I have so little time... maybe something I can work on off and on. Thinking about dinosaur evolution into the miocene would certainly be interesting, and the full culture of venatosapiens would be interesting. I'll think about it.
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:iconpablomeir:
PabloMeir Featured By Owner Apr 9, 2008
lo hevanti...
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:iconashere:
Ashere Featured By Owner Apr 9, 2008  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Hebrew? I don't speak it.
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:iconemperordinobot:
EmperorDinobot Featured By Owner Apr 9, 2008
Now this is really interesting. I have no doubt that if dinosaurs hadn't gone extinct, they could have potentially reached higher levels of intelligence.
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:iconashere:
Ashere Featured By Owner Apr 9, 2008  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Thank you. My critter is a pretty generic form, so I pimped Nemo-
ramjet 's beast as well. No reason they can't be part of the same world.
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:iconajtalon:
AJTalon Featured By Owner Jul 26, 2009  Student Writer
Yeah, the Neanderthal to the Avisapiens' Homo sapiens. Or maybe the men to the Avisapien's hobbits would be a better analogy.
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:iconbehemothmaker:
BehemothMaker Featured By Owner Apr 9, 2008
That's very cool. Who knows, they might discover a species of maniraptorians which used tools.
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:iconewilloughby:
EWilloughby Featured By Owner Apr 9, 2008  Professional General Artist
"Thinking hunter." I like that. :)

Seeing as Bambiraptor is described as having semi-opposable fingers, this idea doesn't seem too terribly farfetched.

Is it wrong of me to hope that someone actually thinks this is a real animal? >.> It would have made a good April Fool's joke had you included some phony citations...
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:iconashere:
Ashere Featured By Owner Apr 9, 2008  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
I should have gotten the citations, darn it.
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